Hand Carved Flower

[custom_frame_left]Hand Carved Flower[/custom_frame_left]

Flowers in Art

Although a painted arrangement of flowers is not uncommon today, flowers as a target in art began as a small ornamental addition to other topics.

The earliest flower discovered in ancient websites is the lotus. It appeared on wall paintings in Egyptian burial places and in low relief sculpture from the earliest dynasties. The lotus blossom was likewise a theme utilized in Egyptian precious jewelry and was the inspiration for the shape of the capital at the top of Egyptian columns.

In the remains of the buried Roman city of Pompeii, covered with volcanic ash from Mt. Vesuvius in 79 A. D, have actually been found fresco paintings of a yard that included some flowers, along with bushes, and trees.

Throughout the Gothic age from about 1200-1400 AD, depiction of flowers in paintings became more specific since they were made use of as signs of the personality or value of specific people.
Paintings of the Annunciation to the Virgin Mary would have a lily representing purity somewhere in the painting. Roses came to symbolize the blood of Christian martyrs in medieval painting.

By the time of the Renaissance, there was a restored interest in Ancient mythology and this was occasionally blended in with Christianity. Botticelli’s 15th century paintings are an example where flowers are utilized to enhance mythological subjects.

In none of these examples though, were flowers the prime target and this secondary function continued up until the 17th century when flower paintings began to be produced by the Dutch.

Even in the Dutch flower paintings there was meaning.
To the individuals of the time, flowers represented much more than beauty. Some paintings showed flowers in different stages from just fledgling, to full bloom, to losing petals. On close assessment, one can typically see tiny insects chewing on flowers or leaves.

In France, throughout the 17th and into the 18th century, a couple of artists started doing still life paintings of flowers. In their studios, French artists painted flowers in vases with aesthetic ideas in mind. Importance did not issue them as it did the Dutch painters.
The 19th century French Impressionists, wanting the optical concepts of light, spent their time painting outdoors recording their impressions of the results of light at numerous times of day and under varying weather. Gardens, flowery meadows, and street suppliers offering flowers were images that were commonly
subjects of Impressionist painters. Their brushwork was loose and the small color patches linked by the brush, rather than being physically mixed, are best comprehended by standing far enough away from the painting that the principle of “Optical Mixing” works.

Shapes, and large areas of color used expressively rather than naturalistically, preoccupied the Post Impressionists like Van Gogh, Gauguin, and Matisse. The famous paintings of sunflowers and irises by Van Gogh are appreciated for their boldness and simpleness in significant contrast to the detail and special of the Dutch flower painting 200 years earlier.

From the start of the 20th century to today, flower paintings have actually tended to be considerably affected by work of earlier artists Significant exceptions are the close-up, abstract flowers done by modernist Georgia O’Keefe, the cutting-edge work discovered by many woodworking artists.

To the people of the time, flowers represented much even more than appeal. Some paintings showed flowers in numerous phases from just fledgling, to full bloom, to losing petals. On close evaluation, one can commonly see small pests chewing on leaves or flowers. In France, throughout the 17th and into the 18th century, a couple of artists started doing still life paintings of flowers. In their studios, French artists painted flowers in vases with aesthetic concepts in mind.

Hand Carved Flower

Hand Carved Flower

 

 

 

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